Reports

Report | Environment Michigan Research & Policy Center

America’s Dirtiest Power Plants

As international leaders prepare for the United Nations Climate Summit next week in New York, a new study shows America’s power plants dump as much carbon pollution into the air any other country’s entire economy except China. Environment Michigan Research & Policy Center pointed to the report as evidence for why the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposal for the nation’s first-ever limits on carbon pollution from power plants is a critical step in the international fight against global warming.

Report | Environment Michigan Research and Policy Center

Wasting our Waterways

The “Wasting Our Waterways” report shows that industrial facilities dumped millions of pounds of toxic chemicals into America’s waterways. In response, the Environmental Protection Agency is considering a new rule to restore Clean Water Act protections to thousands of waterways across the nation.

Report | Environment Michigan

Building A Solar Destination

Ypsilanti can become a “Solar Destination.” By collaborating with local businesses, institutions, and community groups, city leaders can foster a solar future that begins to replace the outdated energy sources of the past, while reducing pollution and building a thriving economy.  To hasten the day when solar energy powers our homes, businesses and even cars, Ypsilanti should adopt a bold and achievable goal of installing 1,000 solar roofs by 2020.

Report | Environment Michigan Research & Policy Center

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

Coal- and natural gas-fired power plants pollute our air, are major contributors to global warming, and consume vast amounts of water—harming our rivers and lakes and leaving less water for other uses. Wind energy has none of these problems. It produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water.

Report | Environment Michigan Research and Policy Center

When it Rains, it Pours

Global warming is happening now and its effects are being felt in the United States and around the world. Among the expected consequences of global warming is an increase in the heaviest rain and snow storms, fueled by increased evaporation and the ability of a warmer atmosphere to hold more moisture.

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